Video Celebrating Girls in STEM

Watch, like, and share this video to show your support for girls in STEM!

On December 19, 2011, the United Nations General Assembly designated October 11th as the International Day of the Girl Child, or Day of the Girl. This day “focuses attention on the need to address the challenges girls face and to promote girls’ empowerment and the fulfillment of their human rights.”

This year, the girls at Digital Harbor Foundation joined with youth at Wide Angle Youth Media to deliver a simple message: the world needs girls in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math (STEM).

They reject stereotypes that boys are naturally better at these subjects than girls, that boys work harder in school, and that girls simply are not meant to go into STEM careers.

They embrace the importance of diversity in today’s global workforce.

They know that girls across the world are working together to create the future.

Want to learn more about how Digital Harbor Foundation is bringing technology education to Baltimore’s youth, regardless of age, background, gender, race, or ability to pay?

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Want to learn more about Day of the Girl or how to encourage gender and racial diversity in STEM?

United Nations International Day of the Girl Child: “There are 1.1 billion girls in the world, and every one of them deserves equal opportunities for a better future. They are a source of energy, power and creativity. They can drive change and help build a better future for all. Yet, most girls face disadvantage and discrimination on a daily basis.”

MakerEd: By enabling educators to use maker education—with a particular focus on those in underserved communities—we believe Maker Ed can help them transform their learning environments, and together we can reach thousands of youth of all ages, backgrounds, and abilities.

Girls Who Code: “Girls Who Code was founded with a single mission: to close the gender gap in technology.”

Black Girls Code: “[We] hope to provide young and pre-teen girls of color opportunities to learn in-demand skills in technology and computer programming at a time when they are naturally thinking about what they want to be when they grow up.”

Girls Communicating Career Connections (GC3): “Videos, games, and fun activities about cool careers that use math and science, created by young people—just like you!”

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