Vinyl Logo Design by Youth

When you are a kid, you reach this point where you think you hold the barometer of cool. I know I thought I had it all figured out. “That kid is cool because he has those shoes….” “That girl is cool because she has that kind of backpack.” One group of people I couldn’t understand as a kid were the gear-heads. They talked engines, cc’s, rpms, and other things that were foreign to me. Since I didn’t understand, I mostly thought what they talked about was dumb and useless. When I caught the maker bug, I realized the fallacy in my pattern of thought. The unknown became more intriguing, and those who were wired differently became valuable.

Here at school, I recognize that many of those same judgments still happen. The sports people are esteemed. The smart people are criticized for doing too well. And the tech squad is treated with so much ambivalence. This is a post to give those guys some credit. They are makers as much as the next…

So Skylar in 12th grade is a metal guy. No we are not talking dark, loud music. We are talking about metal fabrication. The kid loves to weld. He is most at home working in the shop, tinkering with heated metal. He loves cars, and his crew of friends have been customizing vehicles.

The story comes together for me when Skylar asks about making a vinyl decal for their group. They are called the Misfit Mulisha. As Skylar says about their name, “Misfits cause we tend to have different taste and styles then everyone else.”

So Skylar sketched up a logo for their group. It was just a simple pencil and paper drawing:

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From there, we took a picture of the drawing. Then with a jpeg of the drawing, we transferred the image into Cricut. We cleaned it up a little bit, and within moments we were popping out vinyl decals for each of the vehicles. As Skylar says, “[We are a] Group of friends that hangout and help each other work on each others trucks and cars. [We] Like going to car shows and cruising around together.”

Here are some great shots of the decals in place, and also some great shots of true makers.

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Ian Snyder is a science teacher and 3D printing coach at Northumberland Christian School. He also runs a makerspace at The Refuge. Ian is one of our 2015 Perpetual Innovation Fund recipients and will be sharing more updates throughout the year. You can follow him on Twitter @ateachr or catch some shots on Instagram at mriansnyder. Read more from Ian…

3D Printing and Life Hacks

I confess that I get caught up from time to time in the world of life hacks. I find myself asking the question, “How can I manipulate or change this product?” I know this goes against the status quo of just consuming what I am fed… But I can’t help it. Chomp Chomp.

Because of my sickness (constantly needing to hack my life), I decided to try and infect (inspire) my students. Their job was to modify/change/hack an existing 3D design. The design I chose for them was the amazing quick shoe tie labled Klots by Kart5a on Thingiverse. All credit and props to their amazing design.

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(Photo Credit to Thingiverse and Tino Kaartovuori – Kat5a)

Since I loved the simplicity and bare-bone functionality, I just had to have my students do something with it.

Call it foolishness, but I assigned this in the last three weeks of school. Needless to say, I was frustrated when the students were dropping out of the challenge… #endoftheyear…..A terrible state to find your students in. But just when I was ready to hang it up myself, one of my students came through. Abbey L. (the always faithful and reliable) submitted her hack of Klots, printed it, and assembled her design on her shoes.

Abbey’s changes were to modify the closure to look like interlocking x’s. This was a change from the puzzle piece type closure on the original. She also added some triangle spikes on the outside. This fits well with Abbey’s love for the music scene. She also choose to lace with some vertical laces to break from the typical shoe lace pattern.

You can see her smiling face and design below.

Abby Klots

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*On a depressing side note, senior David M was in the middle of a interlocking fish design for the Klots Hack Challenge, but he graduated and faded into the bliss of summer.


Ian Snyder is a science teacher and 3D printing coach at Northumberland Christian School. He also runs a makerspace at The Refuge. Ian is one of our 2015 Perpetual Innovation Fund recipients and will be sharing more updates throughout the year. You can follow him on Twitter @ateachr or catch some shots on Instagram at mriansnyder. Read more from Ian…

Laying My Spatula to Rest

 

No this post is not about anger issues in the kitchen. This post is about saying goodbye to a dear friend. My favorite spatula is soon to be replaced by a new product.

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I am happy to be trying out the flexible build plates from PrintinZ. The plates are called Zebra Plates and they boast the ability to clip to your current build surface and then be easily removed to get your item off. The plate can be flexed in opposing directions allowing the print to pop off the surface. It sounded so good. I had to try it. I sent an email out and got a quick response from owner Wayne Hutmaker, who then sent me a plate for my Printrbot Simple.

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The plate lays over your existing bed. Then you use binder clips to hold it in place. You can see on the right side that I removed the handles from the clip so they do not hit when the bed moves.

My print came out nice and clean. This was a print for our upcoming post on our 3D Printed School Quilt.

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Watch this video of one of our Northumberland senior, Hugh Hayner, get the print from the flexible plate:


Ian Snyder is a science teacher and 3D printing coach at Northumberland Christian School. He also runs a makerspace at The Refuge. Ian is one of our 2015 Perpetual Innovation Fund recipients and will be sharing more updates throughout the year. You can follow him on Twitter @ateachr or catch some shots on Instagram at mriansnyder. Read more from Ian…

DoodleFab at Northumberland Christian School

 

As an educator, I am always excited about the potential of crossing over subject material. 3D Printing has become the universal connector for me. How can I connect 3D printing with science? Math? Geography?

Lately my students have been enjoying turning their art into 3D objects. Thanks to DHF’s (Shawn’s) creation of DoodleFab, we are taking our 2D doodles, drawings, and sketches into the 3D environment. Two of my senior students love art (the art room their second home). When they approached me about turning their classroom doodles into 3D objects, I jumped at the opportunity.

Kyli had sketched a fox running through the forest on an index card with her pencil during class. (I am pretty sure she was still paying attention).

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Then, her best friend Gabby wanted to do the same. She also used an index card to create a drawing of a deer skull adorned with a flower-like pattern. Gabby then created an a 3D replica of her drawing with Doodlefab.

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Both girls are using their objects on their quilt blocks for our 3D printed school quilt project. An update on our school quilt project will be coming in the near future.

(Awesome Doodlefab idea…3D Print famous art pieces for the visually impaired. Feeling Van Gogh’s Starry Night?)

 


Ian Snyder is a science teacher and 3D printing coach at Northumberland Christian School. He also runs a makerspace at The Refuge. Ian is one of our 2015 Perpetual Innovation Fund recipients and will be sharing more updates throughout the year. You can follow him on Twitter @ateachr or catch some shots on Instagram at mriansnyder. Read more from Ian…

3D Printing at Northumberland Christian School

“3D printing is great fun. Even though everyone has heard about 3D printing before, it does not prepare you for the feeling of accomplishment you feel when it creates the object in real life that you created virtually. It has taught me a lot about simple modeling and about how real products are made.” – Luke D. 11th

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When we found out we were selected as a Perpetual Innovation Fund recipient with the Digital Harbor Foundation initiative we were blown away. Opportunities like this don’t usually reach small Christian schools. The surrounding community is small and the overall industry in our area doesn’t scream out innovation. The great thing for us, Digital Harbor looked past the barriers and the stigmas, and gave us a chance. To be honest, it has changed the face of creativity in so many students.

To begin the school year, we began offering 3d design and print classes to 10th-12th grade students. Being we had just one Printrbot Simple, we had to keep the classes small. With a group of 4-5 students working on laptops in our science lab/3d printing space, the idea started to come to life. Our students quickly took to the simple lessons of Tinkercad and within two weeks, we were ready for our first challenge. The first challenge was a kitchen challenge. Students were asked to create something that could be used in the kitchen. This would also be our first fundraiser towards the PI Fund. The way we set it up, students could vote on their favorite design by donating their spare change. The contest was also set up so that the winning design would get a portion of the funds. The winning design was created by Juliette K (a new student this year). She created a double-decker dish, which serves the purpose of holding your cherries or seeds, and has a bowl underneath for your pits or shells.

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“My school’s 3D printer gives an amazing venue for student creativity. It’s really cool to use a program that turns my ideas into high-definition reality. From designing cookie cutters to making accessories to inventing classroom tools, 3D printing is one of my favorite activities at school.” -Juliette K. 10th

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Our next idea was to involve the community. We have a great community here at NCS. Many parents are alumni, and the tight knit community really gives way to some cool opportunities. We decided to do our first family make night to introduce everyone to 3d printing, but also add in the cookie cutter concept. With some student helpers, we ran two computers lab and had a huge turn-out. We had over 50 parents and kids, ranging from kindergarten through high school. The feedback we got was tremendous. Parents and students were amazed at what they could create in such a short time. We spent the next two weeks blasting out about thirty-five cookie cutters in time for Thanksgiving break.

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Following the success of the Family Make Night, we did a student contest with cookie cutters. Any student in the school could submit a cookie cutter design for the contest. From the submitted designs, a few were selected as winners. The winning designs were then offered to the entire school community as potential Christmas gifts. The money generated from the sales went into the PI Fund and the winning designs also got a portion of the money raised. The amount of orders were got was overwhelming. We started printing round the clock and even had to use some extra printers at a local youth center. We raised over $300 dollars and were able to give away $50 to the student designers.

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“3d printing at NCS is a great outlet for me to express creativity. It’s a good environment to just relax, have fun, and learn at the same time.” – Hugh H. 12th

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Currently we have added a second printer here at the school. Because of the success of using our Printrbot Simple, the school agreed to buy a Printrbot Plus. We now have two printers running, and have started using the new printer to design needed items for the school. We have just begun a lettering project involving ProtoPasta’s Carbon Fiber filament. The new printer has also allowed the class size to be increased, and will open the doors for more students next school year.

We are also in the middle of a design challenge involving the use of pencils… More to come from us soon!

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Ian Snyder is a science teacher and 3D printing coach at Northumberland Christian School. He also runs a makerspace at The Refuge. You can follow him on Twitter @ateachr or catch some shots on Instagram at mriansnyder.